Saturday, August 31, 2019

Decorative Nautical Knot Table Mat DIY

I recently got some rope from Amazon in hopes of making a decorative no-sew or non-glued basket. I was thinking about the handcrafted baskets that have become quite trendy! I really didn't find anything of interest for making a basket but I did come across a few nautical knot mats and coasters design that I really loved and decided to give it a try. 

The design of the mat is based on the nautical thump or carrick mats made out of thick hemp ropes. They were used on sailing ships to protect the deck from heavy objects and lessen the noise of the bumping and knocking. I looked at several YouTube videos, trying to get the hang of making a simple mat. I settled in on one video that seemed the easiest to follow. Thank you Johnny Depp!

And to make this mat you just need rope

Let's begin with 25 feet of twisted 3-strand 1/2"cotton rope cord.  Luckily the ends were already sealed with tape. And I hope the following pictures and corresponding steps are not too difficult to follow. 



1.  Fold rope cord in half with loop at one end.

2.  Form another loop by taking the cord over the loop that's there. It looks like a pretzel shape.

3.  Next, take the right side working end and take under middle cord, forming another loop in center.

4.  Then take the end of the same cord, under the loop cord, forming another loop .  .  .

5.  Take the end of the same cord, over the inner cord and under and over the last cord coming out at the bottom. There should be five loops in all after straightening out.

6.   Next, take same cord and follow the original cord, over, under, over, under, pulling cord through matching shapes, creating two rows. To even the cords going around - midway through, switch and use the left working cord end to follow the single cord all the way around.

7.  You should see the outline of a five round pointed knot appearing. At this point, tighten and make sure the cords are straight and start following the cords around for a third row. Going over and under following the cords. Even out the cords by switching up the working end cord to follow around for a third row.

8. Once the third row is completed, begin following the cords around for a fourth row. 

9.  Continue going around, over, under, as before, following cords for the fourth row. Tighten the cords by pulling and adjusting each one to bring the design in closer to the center and to eliminate the openings in the mat. 


When reaching the end, tuck in and secure underneath so they won't show and come loose.  This is the underside.

 Make sure the five round pointed knots are nice and even, and flatten down by rows. 


I am quite pleased with how the mat turned out. I love the design and think it works well as a decorative table mat in today's decor. Great for holiday gatherings! Imagine the possibilities using different types and color of decorative ropes and cords. 

It would also make a lovely coaster gift set done in a smaller version.
 I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This post also contains affiliate links.  I may receive a very small commission.  It does NOT result in additional charges to you or cost you anything extra.  The affiliate money I earn per month helps pay my crafting expenses. Thanks so much for your support!
Thanks for stopping by
and take a little time to enjoy,
Happy Crafting!

Thursday, August 22, 2019

Wireless Light Basket DIY



It's that time again for The Thrift Store Upcycle Challenge on the fourth   Thursday of each month! Here, a group of creative bloggers come together to   share their lovely transformations of a thrift store item. Who doesn't love thrift   store upcycle projects - whether it's actually creating one or admiring how an   item from a thrift store was transformed! 

The Rules:
  • Upcycle an item(s) from a thrift store, resale store, or garage sale into a new piece of decor.
  • There's no monthly theme.
  • There's no budget to stick to.
  Today I'm sharing how I made a wire basket I found at the Goodwill into a hanging light with no electrical wiring whatsoever! I think the basket was part of one of those tiered fruit hanging baskets popular many years ago. But there was only one basket with a chain attached for three dollars! It was in great shape - looking good as new!
I couldn't go wrong with getting this no matter what I did with it.

And that was very little! I didn't want to paint it. I loved the chrome, shiny look! But then it really needed something to dress it up a bit if I was going to make it into a light.  But first, I found this portable light bulb on Amazon that is battery operated and cordless! Perfect for what I wanted!
You can attach the light to any surface with it's peel and stick adhesive on the top. So it fit perfect in the center of the basket!  The bulb is magnetic to hold it in with a push button switch for two brightness levels!  
Some of you may already know that I'm on the design team for Bowdabra! And I'm excited to have recently joined the LaRibbon Influencer Club receiving lots of beautiful LaRibbon ribbon to be used for creative projects! 

So I decided to used part of this lovely leather-like sparkling ribbon to make into a partial decorative shade for my light.

By cutting the 2" wide ribbon into 1/2" strips  .  .  .

 to weave in and out of the wire spokes around the basket. 
As I said before, the ribbon was nice and thick, somewhat leather-like and easy to weave in and out to give the top portion of the shade a woven look!
 Don't you just love how the shade sparkles?
Now all you have to do is hang it up anywhere you need light and turn on the switch! How easy and cool is that!
This is such a lovely way to DIY a thrift store find into a one-of-a-kind hanging light source!
 I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This post also contains affiliate links.  I may receive a very small commission.  It does NOT result in additional charges to you or cost you anything extra.  The affiliate money I earn per month helps pay my crafting expenses. Thanks so much for your support!


And now for more thrifty goodness!


Meet the Hosts:

 Beverly |Across the Blvd  
- Angie | Grandma Creates - Jenny Cookies Coffee and Crafts 
 Amanda | Domestically Creative - Marie | DIY Adulation 

Check out what my fellow upcyclers created below!

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!
Click here to enter

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Raised Oak Leaf Dish DIY


I recently made flowers using clay for the first time and really liked working with it! So naturally I looked on Pinterest for inspiration for other projects. I saw lots of ideas including this dish that I really liked, bowls, magnets and jewelry to pin but nothing really peeked my interest to actually make for this month's Pinterest Challenge.   If you aren't familiar with the Pinterest Challenge, it's a monthly event that's hosted by Erlene @ My Pinterventures and challenges us to not just be pin hoarders, but to make it happen! 

I wanted to make a dish that looked different from the usual. And then, while perusing through one of my favorite online sites, I came across a lovely oak leaf dish 

source
and had a light bulb moment! How easy would this be to re-create in clay - at least something similar! In fact, check out how easy it really was!

Materials needed:
  • Oven baked clay
  • Oak leaf template
  • Parchment paper rolling pin
  • Skewer stick 
  • Glass bowl/small glass
  • Acrylic metallic paints
  • Mod Podge 
First, I had to find a picture of a leaf that I thought would make a nice dish shape. I found an oak leaf image online that I copied, printed and cut out!



Next, the clay that I had in my stash was more than a few years old. It was ok for the flowers that I made, but that was just a small piece removed from the corner of the block and was easy to manipulate!   
 But I found the entire clay block very hard to knead. In fact, after trying to pound it with a hammer with no luck,  I had to put it between parchment paper and stomp on it to help get it soft - for crying out loud!  And that worked somewhat!
I was able to then roll it out using my rolling pin - but still, it was hard rolling and I had to ask hubby to help me with that!
Next, I laid the leaf template down on the clay and started cutting it out using a craft knife.
I was pleasantly surprised how easy it was to remove the excess clay from the leaf pattern.
Then I used a wooden skewer to add vein lines to the leaf.
Next, it was time to bake! Since the dish that inspired me was curved with a flat base, I used a small glass to lay the leaf on to curve the clay dish after placing parchment paper down on the glass bowl to prevent sticking.

Following the baking directions on the package, the clay dish was placed in a 275 degree oven for 15 minutes. Once the dish reached the full baked time, I turned the oven off and let the clay dish cool down in the oven (my idea).
I left the dish sit out over night and then used an emery board to help smooth and round out all of the edges. 
As for painting the clay dish, I did a bit of research on how to paint polymer clay and read never to use spray paint or nail polish on clay. The chemicals in the spray can and polish will eventually break down the clay and colors, destroying the item.

So, I painted the leaf veins a berry metallic color using acrylic craft paint.
Then used a copper metallic to paint the leaf all over. 
I also blended the berry and copper colors together and added the mix around the edge areas for a shaded look. I loved how it was coming together!
And finally, sealed the leaf dish with mod podge.
Don't you just love how this turned out! And it was really that easy!
How's this for a unique clay dish!


I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. This post also contains affiliate links.  I may receive a very small commission.  It does NOT result in additional charges to you or cost you anything extra.  The affiliate money I earn per month helps pay my crafting expenses. Thanks so much for your support!




Let's meet this month's Pinterest Challenge hosts!Pinterest Challenge Blog Hop


To join next month's #pinterestchallenge, click here to sign-up ⇒ September Pinterest Challenge

 Now, let's see what the other hosts have created ⇓⇓

Thursday, August 15, 2019

DIY Fringe Bowl for Fall

Have you noticed fringe is everywhere for fall in home decor these days - furniture, pillows, rugs, accents and especially wall hangings!  Adding fringe to decorative items is a great way of changing or introducing a new look for the season! 

One way could be to use jute twine to coil into a bowl and then add a cool handmade fringe around the top edge! That would be so cool!

Here's how:
Start with a plastic bowl for shaping. I got this one at Target for 79 cents!
 And wrap it in strips of parchment paper instead of plastic wrap that will sometimes stick or melt and make the inside finish shiny.
 Then add fabric glue to the end of a large roll of jute twine (don't cut) and begin twirling it in a tight coil circle.
Place the coiled twine circle on top of the parchment covered bowl and continue adding fabric glue as you twirl the twine around.  

Add lines of glue along the twine as you are coiling it around the bowl base,  making sure to keep the twine even and the circle flat.
Continue coiling and gluing the twine around the bowl, holding the twine firmly in place as you are waiting for the glue to dry (a few seconds) until reaching the end of the bowl.
To finish, cut the twine at an angle, adding a bit of glue, while blending and smoothing into the edge. Gently remove plastic bowl from coiled twine bowl.
Seal the bowl with a coat of mod podge to make the fibers stronger and to control the jute twine threads. 
To make the fringe,  wrap a piece of jute twine around the edge of the finished bowl, overlapping the ends and cut off.  Measure the height of the side of the bowl (8") and begin  cutting eight inch strips of twine.  Then take each twine piece and fold in half forming a loop on one end.

Make a lark's head knot by placing the loop over the long piece of twine. 



With the loop hanging down over the twine, pull the two twine strands through the loop around the twine, pulling strands tight into a knot. 
Continue making larks head knots around the twine .  .  .
until twine is completely covered.
Unravel the twine strands and fluff using a comb or stiff brush. Attach fringe to edge of bowl using fabric glue or a strong glue made for fabric. Use clothespins to hold in place until glue is completely dry.

Back View


You can still insert the plastic bowl back in to use with food or wet items. 
It's a perfect fit!

What a fun way to add a decorative look using fringe!
Ideal for showing off my faux figs for Fall! Oh yeah!



I'm sharing my Fringe Bowl tutorial as part of the Creative Crafter's Group Craft Challenge on Facebook hosted by Janet @Try It, Like It, Create It, where we are challenged to create  themed projects on the 15th of each month.  
Feel free to share your own Fall Crafts posts by linking up below!

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!
Click here to enter